Matt Tunseth

A sometimes-emotional debate about formalizing relations between the Municipality of Anchorage and the Native Village of Eklutna ended with a vote by the Anchorage Assembly on Tuesday to spend the next year exploring ways to bring the two groups closer together.

The debate centered around whether or not to delay the resolution, which Assemblymember Crystal Kennedy of Eagle River said could have “unintended consequences.”

Kennedy said she was not against having a conversation with the tribal government, but initially had concerns about a lack of public input.

Birchwood Community Council members voted Wednesday to ask the Alaska Attorney General’s office to oppose the Native Village of Eklutna in its lawsuit against the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Birchwood residents are celebrating after a controversial project that would have run a water transmission line through their community has been scrapped.

“There are no plans for AWWU to move forward,” Gretchen Wehmhoff told the Birchwood Community Council Wednesday.

Students in Brian Mason’s class at Chugiak High didn’t ace their big test Tuesday. They butchered it.

Mason brought a cow moose carcass to class in the back of his pickup truck that morning, and for the rest of the day his students went to work de-boning, separating, grinding and packaging the animal. The bloody business served as a way to immerse the World Discovery Seminar program students in Alaska cultural traditions, give them a basic understanding of anatomy and teach them practical life skills.

Holiday spirit burned hot on a chilly Friday night in Eagle River last week as the annual Winter Wonderland and Merry Merchant Munch events returned to fill Town Square Park with children, community and cheer.

Not everyone went home happy, but they all drove the same roads home.

A hotly anticipated community meeting on the future of Chugiak-Eagle River schools produced a few barbs but few fireworks Monday at Mirror Lake Middle School as the debate continued between neighbors who support paying to repair earthquake-damaged Gruening Middle School and those who hope to combine the area’s two public high schools.

Editor’s note: The following story contains depictions of sexual violence that may be disturbing to some readers.

A 34-year-old Chugiak man has reached a deal with state prosecutors to admit he raped a 9-year-old girl on Memorial Day of 2018.

Nothing can stop the Merry Merchant Munch and Winter Wonderland celebration from returning to Chugiak-Eagle River. At least, that’s what the local chamber of commerce is promising.

“We are having Merry Merchant Munch no matter what,” said Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber executive director Debbie Rinckey during the chamber’s biweekly lunch forum last month.

The annual event was canceled last year after a magnitude 7.1 earthquake struck the area on Nov. 30.

But Rinckey said a full slate of food and fun is planned for Dec. 6-7 in downtown Eagle River.

Chugiak’s powerhouse stable of runners has produced two more Division I thoroughbreds.

The Mustangs’ Brooklynn Gould and Hyrum Nelson signed Division I National Letters of Intent in the week before Thanksgiving Break, with Gould making the leap to the University of North Dakota and Nelson travelling cross-country to Utah’s Brigham Young University.

Nobody was hurt after powerful winds tore off part of the roof of an Eagle River restaurant Wednesday night.

The Matanuska Brewing Company posted dramatic video of the damage, which took place as a massive storm brought rain and wind gusts of more than 110 MPH to some parts of Anchorage Wednesday afternoon and into Thursday morning.

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