Matt Tunseth

Chugiak-Eagle River Foundation helps nonprofit

During the Oct. 3 Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce meeting, FOCUS Outreach community relations manager Jenna Morales thanked the Chugiak-Eagle River Foundation for its recent $2,000 grant. Morales said the grant will fund four scholarships for children in need.

“Big, big, big thank you to you guys,” Morales said.

Wednesday’s meeting of the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce got a little loose.

“Be weird,” guest speaker Mary McCormick said as chamber members swayed their hips, rocked back and forth on their heels and rolled their ankles inside the Eagle River Ale House.

In many ways, Adrienne Lindholm’s story is the ultimate Alaska cliche.

“I thought I’d have my Alaskan experience in one summer,” the Eagle River author said during a recent interview in Anchorage. “That was 2000, and I’ve been here ever since.”

Members of the South Fork Community Council will meet at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 4 in the first of five local community council meetings scheduled for this month.

The South Fork council meets at Eagle River High School on Yosemite Drive. An agenda will be available before the meeting at communitycouncils.org.

Other meetings this month include the Birchwood, Eagle River Valley, Eagle River and Chugiak councils.

With time running out in the Division I girls race at the state cross country meet at Bartlett, Eagle River’s Emily Walsh decided it was time to rise up. Literally.

“I just thought, ‘If I’m going to pass her it has to be now,” she said after sprinting past rival Ava Earl midway up the long, steep feature known as “Separation Hill” to earn a third-place finish Saturday at the ASAA/First National Bank Alaska State Cross Country Running Championships.

Walsh said she knew if she passed her fellow sophomore with a strong move she might be able to hold onto the podium finish.

In 2015, Daniel Bausch was an unheralded freshman runner for West High watching from the infield as Chugiak’s Ty Jordan blazed to victory in the state cross country championships at Bartlett High. Three years later, Bausch was the one in blue and black atop the podium for the Mustangs.

“I feel like I’m completing a loop,” Bausch said after completing two of them faster than anyone else Saturday en route to a Division I boys state title at the ASAA/First National Bank Cross Country Running Championships at Bartlett High.

Eagle River and Chugiak each suffered lopsided losses in their final regular-season football games Friday and Saturday, but both teams’ seasons are still alive after both advanced to the state playoffs next weekend.

Despite falling 50-7 to nonconference South, the Wolves wrapped up the No. 2 seed in the Division II Northern Lights Conference thanks to a 72-24 Soldotna win Saturday over Kenai Central.

A high-ranking executive for an Alaska oil giant believes recent discoveries more than 800 miles from downtown Eagle River could mean good news for the local business community.

“It’s a pretty exciting time for the company,” said ConocoPhillips vice president for North Slope operations and development Lisa Bruner during the Sept. 19 meeting of the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce at the Eagle River Ale House.

Bruner gave an update of the company’s North Slope operations, which she said have experienced a dramatic turnaround over the past five years.

An always heartwarming event will be a little less chilly and a lot more spicy this fall.

The annual Maddy’s Run 5-kilometer run and fun run event has been moved up a month (from November to October 20), which organizer Dana Johnson thinks could benefit athletes and spectators.

“I think it will be a little more comfortable for the people out there,” Johnson said of the race, which was first run in 2015 and featured some participants running in snow boots and parkas.

They’re still looking for a place to live, but a family of three believes they’ve found a community in Eagle River after receiving an outpouring of support from locals in the aftermath of a dispiriting campsite robbery.

“It’s made it home,” said Sarah Marble Wednesday outside her temporary home at Beach Lake Park, where she and her two sons are staying in a dry cabin owned by the local Parks and Recreation department.

Pages