Matt Tunseth

The last person Sarah Rodden saw was the young man who tried to save her life.

“She looked at me right in the eyes,” said Matt Davis, 17, three days after his only meeting with the 42-year-old woman from Wasilla.

As calamity enveloped them, Davis and his best friend Jared Heaston, 18, calmly worked to help Rodden after she was struck by a vehicle during a Tuesday pile-up on the ice-covered Glenn Highway. Heaston held Rodden’s head and checked for a pulse while Davis performed CPR on Rodden as she lay in the snow-covered highway median.

Last year’s state high school swim meet proved to be a pool of despair for Eagle River’s John Heaphy and Chugiak’s Izzy Powers.

The duo entered the meet as two of the state’s most dominant swimmers, yet neither left with an individual title — Heaphy got nipped at the line in the 100-yard breaststroke by Thunder Mountain’s Bergen Davis, while an injured Powers failed to defend the 50- and 100-yard freestyle titles she won as a sophomore.

Police have identified the woman killed Tuesday in a vehicle vs. pedestrian crash on the Glenn Highway.

On Thursday, Anchorage Police Department spokeswoman Renee Oistad identified the victim as 42-year-old Sarah Rodden of Wasilla. According to APD, Rodden died after she exited her vehicle following a collision on the Glenn near South Birchwood Loop at around 4 p.m. and was subsequently hit by another vehicle sliding into the center median.

Teenagers Michael and Tristen Wheatley were home alone on the afternoon of Sept. 28 when they got into a quarrel that nearly destroyed both their lives.

Michael thinks they were discussing anthropology.

“It’s just bizarre, it’s not even for a reason we would fight over,” he said.

It began as regular rough-housing. Tristen charged at Michael. Michael raised his fist. A reflexive move. It landed in the middle of his brother’s chest.

Tristen went down.

Chugiak wrapped up the No. 3 seed in the upcoming Cook Inlet Conference volleyball tournament with a 3-1 (25-15, 25-19, 22-25, 25-20) win over Bartlett Thursday at Chugiak in the final match of the CIC regular season.

Sophia Lestina had 21 kills and 23 digs for the Mustangs, who got 10 kills from Mazie Edwards and eight from Isabelle Kaltschnee. Claire Schimmack disched 23 assists (and knocked five kills) for Chugiak, which als ogot 10 digs from Cheyenne Young and a five-kill, 10-dig, 25-assist night from Kaitlyn Eastman.

The newest — and smallest — Seawolf is bringing plenty of energy to the UAA basketball team. After signing with the squad at a Wednesday ceremony, Eagle River’s James Ludwig was asked if he’s looking forward to being a part of the UAA men’s basketball program.

“Yeah,” he said before grabbing the microphone and mugging for a crowd of reporters and UAA players.

“I think that’s an excited yes,” chimed in Seawolves head coach Rusty Osborne.

Riders at the Mirror Lake Singletrack Trails are seeing double after a summerlong trail-building project added more than twice the distance to the existing trail system.

“Folks are welcome to go enjoy the trails,” said Will Taygan, a volunteer with the Chugach Mountain Bike Riders (CMBR). “They are ready.”

The new sections of the trail — all 2.75 miles worth — officially opened Monday to bring the total distance up to five miles. Taygan said the trails include everything from beginner routes to black diamond sections for expert riders.

A black bear on campus forced Gruening Middle School to briefly go into “stay-put” mode Wednesday morning.

Anchorage Police Department spokeswoman Renee Oistad said the department got a call at around 8 a.m. about a bear in a dumpster behind the school. Officers quickly arrived on scene, as did biologists from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

A brief brush with the seafaring life has given Eagle River High School science teacher Mark Van Arsdale a new appreciation for the work done by scientists working every day in some of the most far-flung and inhospitable parts of the planet.

“Definitely a take-home for me was in a day and age when we can Google any information, the sheer amount of labor that goes into producing scientific knowledge is overwhelming,” said Van Arsdale, who last month spent two weeks aboard a 121-foot research vessel in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the NOAA Teacher at Sea program.

A resolution that would give the Eagle River-Chugiak Parks and Recreation Department more flexibility in how it allocates its funds was introduced at the Anchorage Assembly Tuesday.

If adopted, the ordinance will change the formula managers use to spend the one-mill property tax levy used to fund the department.

According to parks director John Rodda, the change is needed in order to meet the department’s operating budget for next year.

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