Matt Tunseth

Santa’s helpers have been busily hanging Christmas decorations and stringing up lights at a Boy Scout camp in Chugiak, which for the second year is being transformed into a temporary holiday village.

“We’re putting on the final touches,” Christmas Towne owner Cortney Moore said Monday, four days before the annual venture opens on Black Friday.

Moore started Christmas Towne last year with her husband, Jason, as a way to spread Christmas cheer and create a place where children could experience “something magical,” she said.

Douglas Frey would rather be safe than sorry.

“I shred everything,” Frey told the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce during its biweekly luncheon Nov. 15 at the Eagle River Ale House.

Frey is a vice president at Northrim Bank, where he’s in charge of security and business continuity. It’s a job that puts Frey in constant contact with some of the worst actors on the Internet — and there’s a lot of them out there.

“The threats that we face are constantly changing,” Frey told the chamber.

People in Chugiak really, really don’t like a proposal to allow for higher density housing on a parcel of land located near the McDonald Center in Eagle River.

At its Nov. 16 meeting, the Chugiak Community Council renewed its objection to the much-maligned proposal by the Heritage Land Bank board of directors, which will go before the municipal Planning and Zoning Commission Dec. 11.

“Heritage Land Bank is proceeding along just as they planned,” said Sandy Quimby, who has been an opponent of the proposal since she first learned of it more than a year ago.

An advisory board representing Chugiak-Eagle River area community councils renewed its objection to plans by the Heritage Land Bank to change the allowable housing density on 92 acres of municipal owned land in Eagle River.

At its Saturday, Oct. 28 meeting at the Eagle River Town Center, the Chugiak-Eagle River Advisory Board voted unanimously to oppose any changes to increase housing density in the Carol Creek Site Specific Land Use Plan.

When was the last time you checked your phone? If you’re reading this article, there’s a good chance you’re doing it right now — more than 60 percent of Star readers now get their news from a mobile device; if not, it’s likely you looked at the device in the last hour — studies show Americans check their devices dozens to hundreds of times per day.

The use of screened devices has become ingrained in modern society, and that’s especially true among teens, who according to the Pew Research Center send an average 30 text messages a day.

After a year and a half as executive director of the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce, Dana Thorp-Patterson is going back to school.

Thorp-Patterson said Monday she’s accepted a job at Rogue Community College in Oregon, where she’ll be tasked with building the college’s workforce development program.

“It’s kind of an unexpected deal,” she said. “It just turned out to be too good to pass up.”

Dozens of local wrestlers were among hundreds of athletes who packed the Menard Center in Wasilla over the weekend for the Lancer Smith Memorial Wrestling Tournament, the state’s largest.

With wrestling on eight mats and tournaments for varsity, junior varsity, middle school and girls’ wrestlers, the tournament attracted teams from as far away as Kiana in Northwest Alaska and Ketchikan in Southeast.

UPDATE (9 p.m. Saturday): The Anchorage Police Department updated its public alert Saturday evening to say the puppy has been reunited with its owner.

The department said police dispatch were called at around 5:30 p.m. Saturday by Animal Control saying the dog may have been dropped off.

On his own time and his own dime, an Eagle River man has recently started driving around town as part of a one-man community patrol effort.

Cliff Cook began making the rounds as the new Eagle River Community Patrol Saturday, Nov. 4. Over the course of his first week, Cook said he covered more than 100 miles over 13 hours spread across five days of driving around Eagle River.

The Municipality of Anchorage Parks and Recreation Department is drowning in garbage.

The department is shouldering a heavy burden due to what director John Rodda thinks is a growing homelssness problem in the city.

“It’s very widespread,” Rodda told the Eagle River/Chugiak Parks and Recreation Board of Supervisors on Monday, Nov. 13.

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