Matt Tunseth

Eagle River High School didn’t have to look far to find its new principal.

“I live three miles away,” said Tim Helvey, who was confirmed by the Anchorage School Board to replace Marty Lang earlier this month.

Not only does Helvey live in Eagle River with his wife and two boys, he spent the last school year just up the Glenn Highway at Eagle River’s friendly rival Chugiak.

“I loved Chugiak, the community there was awesome,” said the 47-year-old, who taught social studies in Bristol Bay and Ninilchik before becoming an administrator.

Good things come to those who wait.

After losing three straight ABL games following a season-opening win, the Chugiak-Eagle River Chinooks treated their home fans to a true gem Monday night.

Chinooks starter Jared Reklaitis thrilled fans by taking a no-hitter into the top of the ninth inning in the Alaska Baseball League team’s home opener against the Mat-Su Miners, losing the bid with one out in the ninth on a single by Brayden Merritt.

After a day’s skiing on the steep slopes of Arctic Valley, it’s not uncommon for skiers and snowboarders to gather in the slopeside Alpenglow Lodge to swap tales of fresh powder over a glass of wine or beer. It’s a tradition that links the small nonprofit ski area with lodges from Alaska to the Alps.

“Apres ski is something that’s a part of ski culture all over the world,” said Arctic Valley general manager John Robinson-Wilson last week.

Anchorage police believe they’ve caught the Fire Lake vandal in the act.

Patrol officers arrested a boy June 6 at around 3 a.m. after the Anchorage Police Department received a report of “a man banging on the window of Fire Lake Elementary School” in Eagle River. When police arrived, they found two broken windows and arrested someone they spotted running away from the school, according to a Wednesday press release announcing the vandal’s capture.

Logan White celebrated his 20th birthday with a couple dozen of his new best friends.

“We’re all gelling really well,” said White, who ate birthday cake behind the Chugiak-Eagle River Chinooks clubhouse, courtesy of his host family, Ed and Becca Banfield.

Despite seeing its hopes of a state baseball title crushed by Colony on May 31 in the opening round of the ASAA/First National Bank Alaska High School Baseball Tournament, Chugiak rallied for back-to-back victories to close out the season at Mulcahy Stadium June 1-2.

Chugiak knocked off North Pole on Friday to advance to the tournament’s fourth-place game, where they clobbered Palmer 14-4 to claim fourth.

As racers made the transition from the darkness of the Chugiak High swimming pool into the bicycle transition area outside, most squinted as they were hit by a bright blast of sunlight.

The reactions could have been as much surprise as reflex.

“This race can be hit or miss, and this is definitely a hit for sure,” said Anchorage Triathlon Club president Andy Duenow.

Race co-director Missy Roberts said the sunny skies were far from the norm at an event that has a rainy reputation.

Everything can change in a heartbeat.

Earlier this spring, Eagle River’s Kristin Bozarth started feeling “a bit under the weather.” The busy 35-year-old mother of two active boys had a cough and felt tired, but she soldiered on, continuing to run the household in Alaska while her husband, Scott, worked out of state for the Federal Aviation Administration.

“She was doing everything — taking our kids to scouts, taking the kids to swim practice, we have three dogs…” Scott said.

Due to a combination of exits and ambition, three of four open seats in the Alaska Legislature are guaranteed to be filled by new people in January when the body reconvenes in Juneau.

The list of candidates to represent Chugiak-Eagle River was finalized Friday afternoon, and it includes a crowded field of political newcomers, established politicians and several potential primary punch-ups.

For the first time in quite a while, Bill Popp is bullish on Anchorage’s economy.

“The recession, I believe, seems to be near an end,” the president and CEO of the Anchorage Economic Development Council told the Chugiak-Eagle River Chamber of Commerce earlier this month during its biweekly lunch forum at the Eagle River Ale House. “And yes, I said that here first.”

Popp’s comments came as he prepared to join

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