Matt Tunseth

On Earth Day at the Eagle River Nature Center, life was emerging from nearly every nook and cranny: Big, lazy mosquitos hovered, skittish butterflies fluttered and in the shallow ponds near the center trails, salmon fry fought over a few fledgling flies.

Sometime soon, even the bears will be about.

“We have not run into any bear sightings, but it’s definitely that time of year,” said ERNC operations manager Laura Krueger on Sunday, April 22.

One man’s journey toward autism awareness is helping raise the profile of an Eagle River organization whose mission isn’t always clearly understood.

“They’ve really helped walk me through the process in general of understanding what autism was,” said Michael Harlow, whose two children are on the autism spectrum.

Harlow’s wife first noticed their children having difficulty keeping up with their peers when it came to verbal communication. However, he was initially resistant to the diagnosis.

UPDATE: According to online records, Sala was released from custody on April 30. He is currently under the supervision of pre-trial services while he awaits trial.

ORIGINAL STORY:

A man wanted for robbing a woman at gunpoint in an Eagle River park during a drug deal gone bad has been captured.

A man wanted in connection with an Anchorage pepper-spraying incident was captured Thursday, April 26 in Eagle River.

According to Anchorage Police, Bret Maness was taken into custody at around 11:27 a.m.

Police said Maness allegedly attacked a group of people gathered at the Church of Love in Spenard last week.

Read more at Anchorage Daily News.

One Eagle River institution is leaving another.

Eagle River High principal Marty Lang — who has worked at the school since it opened — is leaving to take a job as deputy director of secondary education for the Anchorage School District.

“I am excited, although it is with a certain amount of bittersweet,” Lang said Monday. “I have really loved living here, being a part of this school and this community.”

Some of the most visible students on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus are speaking out against sexual assault.

“We’re using our voices for a good cause,” said Sarissa Lammers, a senior Nordic skier and mechanical engineering major.

A 2014 Chugiak High grad, Lammers recently helped organize a public service campaign in which UAF athletes posed for photos in their uniforms while holding signs with slogans such as “It’s On Us” and “No More.”

After only a year back in town, the Salvation Army is again retreating from Eagle River.

On Monday, the nonprofit announced it will be closing the Eagle River Family Store location it opened in April of 2017.

For years, Chugiak-Eagle River area residents have doggedly pursued a public place for their pooches to play. While the disucssions have been mostly bark, there’s finally some teeth in plans to bring a dog park to town.

A draft feasibility study on a Chugiak-Eagle River dog park was recently completed by R&M Consultants, which looked at five different sites in the area that might be suitable for a dog park. At the Eagle River/Chugiak Parks and Recreation Board of Supervisors meeting April 9, R&M’s Van Le said the study found two sites most suitable for a park.

A nationwide debate about gun violence arrived Friday at Chugiak High, where opinions about guns are as varied as the rugged terrain surrounding the Anchorage School District’s least urban high school.

Despite strong differences of opinion, organizers of a Friday morning school walkout deemed the event a success.

Local students will be among thousands who leave their classrooms Friday morning for a nationwide protest against gun violence.

The Anchorage Daily News reports students across the Anchorage School District will participate in the walkout, which is scheduled to coincide with the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre in Colorado.

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