Matt Tunseth

Subfreezing temperatures both day and night have caused local lakes to begin to ice up rapidly, but it’s still too soon to venture out onto frozen surfaces.

Municipality of Anchorage Parks and Recreation parks superintendent Josh Durand said the department will begin to issue online ice thickness reports once several inches have formed.

“It first happens when we’re identifying the ice is safe for us to maintain,” Durand said on Tuesday, Nov. 7.

Last year, that date was Nov. 29, while in 2015 it was Nov. 17.

An advisory board representing Chugiak-Eagle River area community councils renewed its objection to plans by the Heritage Land Bank to change the allowable housing density on 92 acres of municipal owned land in Eagle River.

At its Saturday, Oct. 28 meeting at the Eagle River Town Center, the Chugiak-Eagle River Advisory Board voted unanimously to oppose any changes to increase housing density in the Carol Creek Site Specific Land Use Plan.

Theater seats at the Alaska Fine Arts Academy will get a new home while the Eagle River nonprofit looks for one of its own.

A wooded corner of the Municipality of Anchorage is growing a crop of the Anchorage School District’s top students.

Firefighters returned to the scene of an early-morning Oct. 31 house fire in the Eagle River Valley that sent two people to the hospital with minor injuries after flames reappeared from the structure.

According to Anchorage Fire Department chief Denis LeBlanc, crews were called back to a home located off Eagle River Road at around 9:18 a.m. Tuesday after the fire — which was declared out at around 7:30 a.m. — reappeared at the location.

A student at Alpenglow Elementary was charged with assault after allegedly brandishing a knife at another student while they were walking home from school.

On Oct. 18, Anchorage School District officials notified police that a student had pulled a knife on another student two days before while both were walking home from the school on Driftwood Bay Drive. Police arrived at the school and charged the boy with third-degree assault. He was released to his parents.

Tim Benningfield has never quite been able to get Alaska out of his blood.

First exposed to the state in 1989 while working as an Army medic at Fort Richardson, Benningfield returned to Alaska in 2012 after a 20-year career as a firefighter in his native Kentucky. After spending five years as a fire and emergency professor at UAA, Benningfield and his wife, Debby, returned to the Lower-48 in 2016.

But something didn’t feel right.

Crime is on the minds of local residents, who continue to voice their concerns about everything from an increase in vehicle thefts to drug needles found on residential streets in community forums throughout Chugiak-Eagle River.

A meeting of the Chugiak-Eagle River Advisory Board has been called to look into proposed changes to the Municipality of Anchorage’s water and sewer code.

The meeting will be held at noon Saturday, Oct. 28 in the community room at the Eagle River Town Center building (12001 Business Boulevard).

Birchwood Community Council member Debbie Ossiander said the meeting will primarily deal with what the re-write could mean for Chugiak-Eagle River residents.

“There’s an ordinance coming that tightens up and increases the standards for septic systems,” she said.

Although the 2017 Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is being held in Anchorage, the communities just north of town will be well represented Thursday when the annual gathering of Alaska Natives begins at the Dena’ina Center.

When the opening session begins Thursday morning, representatives from the Native Village of Eklutna and Eklutna Inc., will welcome between 4,000 and 5,000 delegates on behalf of the Dena’ina people.

Native Village of Eklutna president and chairman Lee Stephan said he was having a hard time containing his excitement at the honor.

Pages