Matt Tunseth

A spokesperson for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game said Saturday a third bear was shot and killed in the Eagleridge neighborhood on Wednesday.

State biologists Thursday were still trying to locate a brown bear believed to be responsible for the death of a 44-year-old hiker and the mauling of a 51-year-old man searching for him.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game spokesman Ken Marsh said the department set out bear traps Wednesday night to try and capture the animal, which a witness described as a large brown bear.

Biologists were monitoring the traps Thursday.

A 7-year-old Alaskan husky named Nanook is being credited with helping rescue a cold, injured hiker Wednesday night in the Eagle River Valley.

“He’s Alaska’s version of Lassie,” said Lt. Eric Olsen with the Alaska State Troopers.

A brown bear killed a 44-year-old hiker deep in the South Fork Eagle River Valley and mauled a member of a search party looking for him on Wednesday, Anchorage police said.

Michael Soltis’ body was found in the same area near the end of Hiland Road — a winding, 9-mile-long route into the South Fork Eagle River Valley — where a brown bear also attacked a man searching for the missing Eagle River civil engineer Wednesday morning.

“It appears the brown bear was protecting the body when it attacked a member of the search party,” APD said.

A week-long trash binge is over for a pair of Eagle River brown bears who were shot and killed by state wildlife officials Monday night.

According to Fish and Game spokesman Ken Marsh, Fish and Game biologists and an Alaska wildlife trooper arrived in the Eagle Ridge subdivision Monday night in search of the bears, which had been getting into trash for more than a week.

“I think they encountered them fairly quickly,” Marsh said Monday.

Marsh said the bears were spotted wandering through the neighborhood in search of their favorite meal: trash.

A death sentence has been handed down for a pair of trash-eating brown bears in Eagle River.

“They’re going to be euthanized,” said Alaska Department of Fish and Game assistant Anchorage area biologist Cory Stantorf.

Jordan Wharton is tearing up the Alaska Baseball League.

The Indiana Wesleyan University and Chugiak-Eagle River Chinooks infielder is currently leading the ABL with a .441 batting average and 15 hits through the first nine games of the season. Wharton’s hot start continued during a recent three-game series with the Peninsula Oilers that saw the 6-foot-1 righty from Akron, Ohio pick up six hits, including a homerun.

In an effort to gain local support for a proposed homeless veterans housing facility, the chairman of the group behind the project made a swing through Eagle River last week.

Ric Davidge, chairman of the Alaska Veterans Foundation, met with the Eagle River Valley and Eagle River community councils, where he laid out his vision for the facility to potential neighbors.

“Our mission is very simple: Do what no one else will do for veterans,” Davidge told the Eagle River Community Council at its June 14 meeting.

The sky’s no limit for Chugiak’s Michael Connelly.

The 16-year-old mountain running phenom broke the 17-and-under age group record Sunday during his fifth-place run at the Robert Spurr Memorial Hill Climb on Bird Ridge.

“I’m very excited,” said Connelly, who completed the 3,400-foot climb to the summit in 41 minutes, 40 seconds to place fifth overall.

Red, white and blue were on full display Thursday outside the Eagle River Lions Club, where more than 50 people stood in the bright sunshine to take part in a patriotic celebration of the nation’s banner. From the red of the Boy Scouts’ neckerchierf to the puffy white clouds to the bright blue sky overhead, the day was ideal for celebrating the nation’s colors.

“The whole point is Americanism,” said Lodge 2682 exalted ruler Ted “Raven” Palmer after the half-hour ceremony, which included patriotic songs, an opening prayer and messages of patriotism from club members.

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